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Expected Behaviour Policy
Expected Behaviour Policy

How you should behave when borrowing or lending vehicles via Cuvva

Joey M avatar
Written by Joey M
Updated over a week ago

This Expected Behaviour Policy sets out how you should behave when borrowing or lending vehicles via Cuvva or creating and administering car clubs, including what happens if a vehicle loan is cancelled. It forms a part of our general Ts&Cs.

If you are borrowing another customer’s vehicle we refer to you as the “Borrower”. If you are lending your vehicle to another customer we refer to you as the “Lender”. If you create and administer a car club, we refer to you as the “Car Club Admin”.

1. What Borrowers need to know

1.1 Agree the terms of your hire with the Lender

If you are a Borrower, you are making a direct and binding agreement with the Lender to borrow their vehicle. You should make sure to agree the terms of that loan with them. Unless the Lender has specifically agreed otherwise, we and the Lender would expect you to use their vehicle fairly and abide by the following terms which will apply to the agreement between you and the Lender.

1.2 Return it with the same fuel or charge level

You should always bring the vehicle back with the same level of fuel as when you picked it up, unless you’ve agreed otherwise with the Lender. If you return the vehicle with less fuel than agreed, the Lender is entitled to ask you to pay for the cost of fuel. We’d recommend you making a note or taking a photo of the fuel gauge at the start of your borrowing period so that you know how much to put in before you return the vehicle to the Lender.

If you’re borrowing an electric vehicle, we recommend you agree up-front with the Lender what their expectations are around charging, and make a note or take a photo of the battery level if they ask for it to be brought back at the same level.

1.3 No smoking or vaping

Always ask the Lender if you are allowed to smoke or vape in their vehicle. If in doubt, don’t smoke or vape in someone else’s vehicle. Lenders have the right to designate a vehicle to be non-smoking and if so, Borrowers should ensure that neither they nor their passengers smoke in any borrowed vehicle. Non-smoking means (but is not limited to) no smoking or vaping of any tobacco or tobacco-related products, e-cigarettes or vapes.

1.4 Service animals are allowed, but no pets

Unless agreed beforehand by the Lender, any vehicle lent out on Cuvva shouldn’t be used for carrying pets. Borrowers should ensure that neither they nor their passengers carry pets in the car, unless their pet has a medical emergency or is a service animal.

You are allowed service and assistance animals in your vehicle (this means recognised service or assistance animals and not pets or emotional support animals). Service or assistance animals don’t need to be in a crate/carrier while in the vehicle.

1.5 You’re responsible for looking after the vehicle

When borrowing a Lender’s vehicle you are responsible for looking after it during the time of your loan, so please take care.

This means that if you damage the vehicle, it is your responsibility to make it up to the Lender. This means that you will need to make an insurance claim under your insurance policy for any damage covered under your policy.

If the damage you’ve caused isn’t covered by your insurance policy (or a third party’s insurance in the event of an accident), then you, the Borrower, are responsible for repairing the damage or compensating the Lender accordingly.

This Expected Behaviour Policy and our general Ts&Cs should set out the terms of the agreement between you and the Lender in most cases where there is a dispute between you over damage. For example, unless the Lender has agreed otherwise smoking is not permitted, so if you have damaged the interior of the vehicle through smoke or burn damage, you will be responsible for the reasonable costs of repair.

1.6 You’re responsible for damage, but normal wear and tear is to be expected

Normal wear and tear is an inherent part of using and renting out a vehicle and the Lender is not covered for it under the Borrower’s insurance policy.

While the Borrower is responsible for the damage they cause during their rental, the Lender is responsible for wear and tear on their vehicle generally, including but not limited to mechanical parts like brakes, engine parts and suspension.

We recommend that the Borrower and Lender both take photos of any potential issues before setting off and again when returning the vehicle. Where a vehicle is returned with wear and tear, the Borrower is not liable to the Lender for this. Where a vehicle is damaged, the Borrower is liable to the Lender for the cost of repair, either personally or under the Borrower’s insurance policy.

The following table shows some examples of what counts as wear and tear, and what counts as damage for which the Borrower or their insurer may be responsible.

Wear and tear

Damage

Weathering and scuffing

Any weathering to the paint or minor scuffing of interior surfaces

Damage which goes beyond scuffing and which falls into one of the damage categories below

Scratches and chips

2.5cm or less

>2.5cm or that leave exposed metal/paintwork removed

Dents

1cm or less

>1cm per dent, or more than 2 dents of any size on one panel, or any paintwork damaged (e.g. chips to paintwork)

Glass

Micro scratches, no field of vision impact

Cracks or holes, and impact on field of vision

Alloys or hubcaps

2.5cm or less

>2.5cm or missing hubcap, cracked alloy

Interior

2.5cm or less

>2.5cm or broken parts, deep scratches, holes, burn marks

1.7 Remain contactable

You should swap contact details with the Lender at the outset, and you must remain contactable during the booking.

1.8 Be punctual

You must arrive punctually at the agreed time to borrow the Lender’s vehicle. Don’t keep them waiting - they are being kind enough to lend you a car. Remember, if you are late you must not drive without insurance - you should purchase an extension to the policy through the app.

1.9 Stick to your agreement

In agreeing to borrow a vehicle from the Lender, you are making a binding commitment - and you need to stick to it. If you have agreed to borrow a vehicle for a set period of time or for a particular purpose, you should follow through unless there is a very good reason not to (like in an emergency or if the Lender agrees to changes). The same applies to getting the key from the Lender if you’ve agreed to meet at a particular place and time.

Please be courteous and respectful to each other. If your plans have changed and you no longer need to borrow a vehicle, please let the Lender know and cancel your booking as far ahead as you can.

1.10 Bring your driving licence

You must bring your driving licence with you when you collect the vehicle from the Lender. The Lender may ask to check your driving licence to ensure that your booking and ID is correct.

1.11 Don’t pick up a car which doesn’t look roadworthy

Although it is the Lender’s responsibility to ensure that their vehicle is roadworthy and clean, we strongly recommend that any Borrower ensures that they are happy with the condition of a vehicle before borrowing it. If in doubt about the condition of a vehicle, don’t borrow it.

When collecting a vehicle, you should check that a vehicle is roadworthy before borrowing it. Roadworthiness includes, but is not limited to:

  • Tyres being in good condition, with adequate tread depth, and at the correct pressure

  • The handbrake working;

  • Electric windows working;

  • All mirrors, cameras and other sensors and aids fitted as standard in the vehicle being in place and functioning;

  • All mirrors being free from cracks;

  • Seats being adjustable;

  • Seat belts being present and working;

  • Headlights, indicators, brake lights and reversing lights working;

  • No cracks or damage to the windscreen (and any minor chips on windscreen are noted down);

  • The in-car entertainment and other peripherals working;

  • Washer fluid being present; and

  • Oil level (as shown on dipstick) being sufficient.

1.12 Keep the vehicle clean

The Borrower must return the vehicle in the same condition as when they first borrowed it. To avoid any later arguments about the condition of a vehicle, we’d recommend that both Lenders and Borrowers take photos of the vehicle before the Borrower drives it away, and when returning it.

1.13 Check there hasn’t been any misrepresentation about the vehicle

If the Lender has misrepresented the vehicle (e.g. it is a different vehicle when the Borrower turns up to collect it or is in a different condition), the Borrower must not borrow the vehicle. If the vehicle has been misrepresented, the Borrower must take clear photos of the issues then immediately contact customer support for cancellation and full refund.

1.14 Legal requirements

It is your responsibility to drive legally and safely. This includes ensuring that the vehicle is adequately insured. You must ensure that you take out insurance on the vehicle you are borrowing - it is not the Lender’s responsibility to sort your insurance.

You must abide by the country’s Highway Code and driving regulations at all times.

You must hold a valid UK driving licence at all times.

In the event of an accident, you must contact us straight away via the claim number provided with your policy. It’s your responsibility to ensure that any claims under your insurance policy are properly and promptly reported.

In addition to any rights the Lender or your/their insurer might have if you fail to abide by these rules, Cuvva reserves the right to freeze or ban you and/or your vehicle from the Cuvva platform for violating any part of this Expected Behaviour Policy.

1.15 Pay any fines and charges

The Borrower shall be liable for the following fines and costs incurred during the booking period:

  • any and all traffic offence penalties, including parking tickets, speeding fines, clamping fines, bus lane fines and other charges; and

  • any tolls, fees or charges including but not limited to toll roads, for example the Dartford crossing toll and congestion or clean air zones such as the London Congestion Charge.

The Borrower is liable for any parking charges incurred at the point of return.

If you’re parking on the street, choose a spot that's legal and safe for the next 24 hours.

It is the responsibility of the Borrower to pay the relevant authorities directly.

In the case of speeding notices the Borrower acknowledges and agrees that the Lender may pass on the Borrower’s details to the police or relevant authority, who may then contact the Borrower directly.

2. What Lenders need to know

2.1 Agree the terms of the hire with the Borrower

If you are a Lender, you are making a direct and binding agreement with the Borrower to lend them your vehicle. You should make sure to agree the terms of that loan with them. Unless you have specifically agreed otherwise, we and the Borrower would expect you to abide by the following terms which will apply to the agreement between you and the Lender.

2.2 Agree fuel or charge levels

We’d recommend you agreeing with the Borrower what your expectations are around fuel, and make a note or take a photo of the fuel gauge if you ask for it to be brought back at the same level.

If you’re lending an electric vehicle, we’d recommend you agreeing with the Borrower what your expectations are around charging, and make a note or take a photo of the battery level if you ask for it to be brought back at the same level.

2.3 Remain contactable

You should swap contact details with the Borrower at the outset and remain contactable during the booking.

2.4 Be punctual

You must ensure that your vehicle is ready to go for the Borrower by the start of their borrowing period. Don’t make them wait - they are paying for insurance by the hour.

2.5 Stick to your agreement

In agreeing to lend your vehicle to the Borrower, you are making a binding commitment - and you need to stick to it. If you have agreed to lend your vehicle to the Borrower for a set period of time or for a particular purpose, you should follow through unless there is a very good reason not to (like in an emergency or if the Lender agrees to changes). The same applies to getting the key to the Borrower if you’ve agreed to meet at a particular place and time.

Please be courteous and respectful to each other. If your plans have changed and you can not lend your vehicle, please let the Borrower know and cancel their booking as far ahead as you can.

2.6 Look after the condition of your vehicle

You, the Lender, are responsible for ensuring that your vehicle is roadworthy and clean before lending it to a Borrower. If an accident occurs as a result of you poorly maintaining your vehicle, the insurer could choose to pursue a recovery against you.

Roadworthiness includes, but is not limited to:

  • Tyres being in good condition, with all having adequate tread depth and at the correct pressure

  • The handbrake working;

  • Electric windows working;

  • All rear viewing mirrors, cameras and other sensors and aids fitted as standard in the vehicle being in place and functioning;

  • All side mirrors being free from cracks;

  • Seats being adjustable;

  • Seat belts being present and working;

  • Headlights, indicators, brake lights and reversing lights working;

  • No cracks or damage to the windscreen (and any minor chips on windscreen are noted down);

  • The in-car entertainment and other peripherals working;

  • Washer fluid being present; and

  • Oil level (as shown on dipstick) being sufficient.

Please ensure your vehicle is clean inside/outside and is free of any personal items and rubbish.

To avoid any later arguments about the condition of a vehicle, we’d recommend that both Lenders and Borrowers take photos of the vehicle before the Borrower drives it away, and when the Borrower returns it.

2.7 Check the Borrower’s identity

Only the Borrower can drive the vehicle. The Lender must check the Borrower’s driving licence to verify their identity before allowing the loan to go ahead. If their driving licence cannot be verified by the Lender, the Lender must not let them borrow the vehicle.

Tips on how to verify a licence:

Check that the Borrower’s licence:

  • is valid for the type of vehicle, hasn’t expired and hasn’t been tampered with;

  • shows a name that matches the Borrower’s name; and

  • has a photo that matches the Borrower (taking the date of birth and licence issue into account).

2.8 Legal requirements

You must ensure that your vehicle is:

  • validly taxed (if applicable);

  • not subject to a SORN (statutory off road notification); and

  • has a valid MOT.

In addition to any rights the Borrower or your/their insurer might have if you fail to abide by these rules, Cuvva reserves the right to freeze or ban you and/or your vehicle from the Cuvva platform for violating any part of this Expected Behaviour Policy.

3. Cancellations

3.1 Cancellation by the Borrower

Borrowers may cancel their trip at any time by contacting customer support. Any cancellation will be effective immediately. Whether the Borrower receives a refund or not depends on the circumstances:

  • If the Borrower cancels before their booking start time, Cuvva will refund the Borrower in full.

  • If the Lender is a ‘no-show’ — that is, the Lender hasn't cancelled and doesn’t show up within 15 minutes of the scheduled trip start — Cuvva will refund the Borrower in full.

  • Otherwise, if the Borrower cancels after their booking start time, the booking fees will be retained by Cuvva and the Lender.

3.2 Cancellation by the Lender

Lenders may cancel a Borrower’s trip at any time before the policy has started by contacting customer support. Any cancellation will be effective immediately.

If a Lender cancels a Borrower’s trip or is a Lender no-show — that is, the Lender hasn't cancelled and doesn’t show up within 15 minutes of the scheduled trip start — Cuvva will refund the Borrower in full.

If a Lender repeatedly cancels Borrowers’ trips, Cuvva reserves the right to freeze or ban the account.

3.3 Cancellation by Cuvva

In some cases, the Cuvva team will cancel a Borrower’s booked trip. If that happens, Cuvva will contact the Borrower and Lender.

If Cuvva considers that a cancellation is the Lender’s fault - in other words, a cancellation is appropriate because of any act or omission of the Lender, such as the vehicle not being roadworthy - Cuvva will refund the Borrower in full.

If Cuvva considers that a cancellation is the Borrower’s fault - in other words, a cancellation is appropriate because of any act or omission of the Borrower, such as making a misrepresentation - no refund is due to the Borrower.

3.4 Valid reasons for Lenders or Borrowers to cancel

3.4.1 Extenuating circumstances

Exceptions to the above rules may apply in certain extenuating circumstances:

  • Death of customer or in their family

  • Hospitalisation

  • Government mandated obligations

  • Airline/travel interruptions

Please contact our customer support team to arrange a refund in these or any other extenuating circumstances.

3.4.2 Roadworthiness of vehicle

If the Borrower discovers that the car doesn’t meet legal requirements or is unsafe to drive, the Borrower must not start the trip.

Safety reasons include (but aren’t limited to): outdated or missing registration, broken mirrors, tyres with tread under the legal limit, or other roadworthiness issues as stated in Section 2.6.

If the vehicle is unable to be driven, the Borrower must take clear photos of the issues then immediately contact customer support for cancellation and full refund.

4. Guidance on sharing information for Car Sharing

4.1 To facilitate Car Sharing, a Lender, Borrower or Car Club Admin may choose to post images and/or text relating to the Lender, Borrower, the Lender’s car, or the car club to be shared with other users of the Cuvva app. We refer to any content contributed by you to our app which is visible to at least a subset of the app’s users as “User-Generated Content” or “UGC”. Examples of UGC may include the user name, profile photo, description of the car, the car photo, and description of the car club.

4.2 Any User-generated Content must not amount to “Harmful Behaviour”. “Harmful Behaviour” means posting, creating, messaging or publishing anything which is in our opinion defamatory, libellous, offensive, harassing, obscene, malicious, discriminatory or which may otherwise be harmful, distressing, inappropriate or unacceptable. The following table shows some (but not all) examples of what counts as Harmful Behaviour.

Category

Examples of Harmful Behaviour

Hate Speech

  • Racial slurs, derogatory language targeting specific races, ethnicities, or nationalities.

  • Homophobic or transphobic remarks.

  • Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, or religious discrimination.

Harassment and Threats

  • Personal attacks, name-calling, and bullying.

  • Threats of violence, harm, or doxxing (revealing personal information).

  • Sexual harassment.

Violence

  • Depicting or facilitating gratuitous violence or other dangerous activities.

  • Sharing content related to terrorism.

Discrimination

  • Gender-based discrimination or sexism.

  • Ageism, ableism, or discrimination against individuals with disabilities.

  • Discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity, or other protected characteristics.

Dangerous or inappropriate products

  • Facilitating the sale of or providing instructions for the manufacture of explosives, firearms, ammunition,certain firearms accessories,other weapons,marijuana, or tobacco, regardless of legality.

Spam and Scams

  • Unsolicited advertising or fraudulent schemes.

Impersonation and Misrepresentation

  • Pretending to be someone else or creating fake profiles to deceive others.

Sexual Content

  • Sharing any kind of sexually explicit content.

Images

  • Sharing images or videos depicting violence or, self-harm.

  • Using visual media, to promote hate speech, racism, or discrimination.

  • Sharing private or sensitive images or videos of individuals without their consent.

  • Posting images or videos depicting the abuse or harm of animals.

  • Sharing images or videos without proper attribution or permission when copyrighted material is involved.

  • Creating and sharing visual media that impersonate individuals or organisations to deceive or cause harm.

Illegal activities

  • Facilitating or promoting illegal activities.

Inappropriate health content

  • Exposing others to harmful health content and services.

  • Facilitating the sale or purchase of prescription drugs.

  • Sharing misleading health claims.

Infringement of intellectual property

  • Infringing on the intellectual property rights of others.

Privacy

  • Committing deceptive, malicious, or intentional abuse or misuse of any network, device, or personal data.

Child endangerment

  • Sharing content that facilitates the exploitation or abuse of children, including any child sexual abuse materials.

Financial content

  • Sharing deceptive or harmful financial products and services, such as gambling

Misleading content

Sharing false or misleading information

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